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Gas-Saving Products: Facts or Fuelishness?

    Gas prices are on the rise again! So what's with all these gas saving devices? Do they really do what they claim or just put your money in their pockets?
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» Part 1: Fact or Fiction?
» Part 2: Complaints
» Part 3: Saving Tips
» Part 4: Saving Tips
»
Part 5: Tested Devices
» Part 6: Tested Devices
» Part 7: Tested Devices
 

Maintain Your Car

  • Keep your engine tuned. Studies have shown that a poorly tuned engine can increase fuel consumption by as much as 10 to 20 percent depending on a car's condition. Follow the recommended maintenance schedule in your owner's manual; you'll save fuel and your car will run better and last longer.
  • Keep your tires properly inflated and aligned. Car manufacturers must place a label in the car stating the correct tire pressure. The label usually is on the edge of the door or door jamb, in the glove box, or on the inside of the gas cap cover. If the label lists a psi (pounds per square inch) range, use the higher number to maximize your fuel efficiency. Underinflated tires cause fuel consumption to increase by six percent.
  • Change your oil. Clean oil reduces wear caused by friction between moving parts and removes harmful substances from the engine. Change your oil as recommended by the vehicle manufacturer.
  • Check and replace air filters regularly. Your car's air filter keeps impurities in the air from damaging internal engine components. Not only will replacing a dirty air filter improve your fuel economy, it also will protect your engine. Clogged filters can cause up to a 10 percent increase in fuel consumption.

Consider Buying A Fuel-Efficient Vehicle
Deciding which vehicle to buy may be the most important fuel economy decision you make. The difference between a car that gets 20 MPG (miles per gallon) and one that gets 30 MPG amounts to $1,500.00 over 5 years, assuming gas costs $1.50 per gallon and you drive 15,000 miles a year.

Visit www.fueleconomy.gov for more information. You'll find gas mileage estimates and other data from EPA for 1985-2001 model year cars.

EPA Evaluation Efforts
The EPA evaluates or tests products to determine whether their use will result in any significant improvement or detriment to fuel economy. However, the EPA cannot say what effect gas-saving products will have on a vehicle over time because it hasn't conducted any durability tests. It's possible that some products may harm the car or may otherwise adversely affect its performance. In fact, today's vehicles' emission control systems are very sophisticated and complex. They have On Board Diagnostic features that alert the driver to problems associated with the emission control and fuel delivery systems. Retrofit products may have an adverse effect on these systems.

More...
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Part 1       » Part 2       » Part 3       » Part 4
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Part 5       » Part 6       » Part 7
Additional Information provided courtesy of
ALLDATAdiy.com and Warranty Direct
© 2000-2007 Vincent T. Ciulla

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