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It Is The Season To Save Money


The cost of new transportation is expensive. However, there are several used vehicles that you might want to consider.

  By Kyle Busch
 About Kyle Busch
Kyle Busch is the author of "Drive the Best for the Price ..." He has over a quarter-century of experience buying used vehicles and saving money.
More about Kyle

The cost of new transportation is expensive. However, there are several used vehicles that you might want to consider. The following vehicles all have good ratings and current market forces have made them available at very reasonable prices.

Five vehicles worth your consideration:

1. The Toyota Camry has been one of the best vehicles in America for years. New Camry's cost $18,500 to $25,000.

Now that the redesigned 2002 Camry has been circulating in the market, you can buy (if you shop carefully) a used 2001 Toyota Camry LE with 30,000 to 35,000 miles for $10,000 to $10,500. This car is an excellent value at this price. The vehicle should still have about two years remaining on the manufacturer's Powertrain (engine and transmission) warranty. This vehicle can be driven for hundreds of thousands of miles.

2. The Honda Accord has also been one of America's best selling automobiles. New Accords cost $18,500 to $26,000.

You can buy a 2001 Accord LX with 30,000 to 35,000 miles for about $10,500-$11,000. This vehicle can also be driven for hundreds of thousands of miles.

3. The Mazda 626 has also been a reliable vehicle. A new Mazda 6 cost $17,500 to $24,000.

Mazda does not quite have the name of the Toyota or the Honda. You can buy a 2001 Mazda 626 with 30,000 to 35,000 miles for about $8,000 to $9,000. This vehicle should also have about two years remaining on the Powertrain warranty. This vehicle can provide many years of dependable transportation.

4.The Buick Century is also a good bet in used transportation. New Century's cost $17,000 to $24,000.

You can buy a 2001 Buick Century with 25,000 to 30,000 miles for about $ 8,000 to $9,000. This vehicle can provide many years of dependable transportation.

5. The Nissan Altima is also a pretty good value. New Altima 2.5's cost $17,000 to 23,000. The Altima was redesigned in 2002 to be a much larger car than the previous model.

If you are on a transportation budget, you can buy a 1996 Altima GXE with 60,000 to 75,000 miles for about $3,000 to $4,000. At this age and mileage, the vehicle will not include any remaining manufacturer's warranty, however, the Altima is quite reliable and economical to drive. This car can provide a number of years of good transportation service.

If you are in the market for a vehicle, do your homework. Consult "Consumer Report's" automotive issue (April). Also, be sure to read a couple of new vehicle road tests on the used vehicle of interest in auto magazines (many are available at your local library) or Internet sources such as "Car and Driver," "Motor Trend," "Road & Track," or "MotorWeek". Information from the road tests will allow you to zero in which of the vehicles discussed above will be the best for you.

For example, if you prefer a softer ride consider the Camry; if you prefer a stiffer more European ride, consider the Accord; and if price is the biggest consideration, consider the Mazda. Last, but not least, if you are going to buy a 3 to 4 year-old vehicle, try to get the 2000 model rather than the 199x model. Years down the road when you sell the vehicle, the 2000 model will be worth more than the "past century" vehicle.

Kyle Busch is the author of Drive the Best for the Price: How to Buy a Used Automobile, Sport-Utility Vehicle, or Mini-van and Save Money. The book can be ordered from Barnes and Noble or Borders. Learn more about the book and the author at: www.drivethebestbook.com. The web site accepts all transportation questions.

© 2003 Kyle Busch
Additional Information provided courtesy of
ALLDATAdiy.com and Warranty Direct
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